News Id: 843863

Subway Gunman Is Still at Large as New Yorkers Begin Commute

The police identified a 62-year-old man as a “person of interest” after the mass shooting on a subway train in Brooklyn. At least 23 people were injured.

The New York Times: The police identified a 62-year-old man as a “person of interest” after the mass shooting on a subway train in Brooklyn. At least 23 people were injured.

Millions of New Yorkers were beginning their commutes on Wednesday in a city gripped with unease, as a gunman remained at large after shooting 10 people on a Brooklyn subway train during the morning rush hour the day before.

The police on Tuesday evening identified a man they called a “person of interest” in the mass shooting, one of the worst outbreaks of violence in the subway in recent history. The man, Frank R. James, 62, was not named as a suspect, but the authorities said that people should call with any information they had on Mr. James.

The shooting will complicate recent efforts by Mayor Eric Adams and Gov. Kathy Hochul to convince people that the subways are safe, after months in which a spate of random attacks on the system have contributed to a drastic fall in ridership.

The shooting took place on Tuesday morning in the Sunset Park neighborhood. As a crowded N train approached the 36th Street station, a gunman donned a gas mask, tossed two smoke grenades on the floor and fired 33 shots before fleeing the scene.

In addition to the 10 people hit by gunfire, five of whom were critically injured, at least 13 others suffered injuries related to smoke inhalation, falls or panic attacks, the authorities said.

Police officers say they believe a collection of belongings left on the train — including a Glock 9-millimeter handgun and the key to a U-Haul van that was found a few blocks away — belonged to the gunman.

Mr. James has addresses in Wisconsin and Philadelphia, and the authorities are offering a $50,000 reward for his capture. He appears to have posted dozens of videos on social media in recent years in which he expressed a range of harshly bigoted views and criticized the policies of New York City’s mayor, Mr. Adams.

New York police officials and their federal counterparts have asked that people share cellphone video from the shooting site or elsewhere that might help bring the manhunt to a swift conclusion.

Previous manhunts for attackers in New York City have dragged on for days, weeks or even months, though. And the Sunset Park investigation is already facing a glaring obstacle: At least one camera at the station failed to capture anything during the attack, an oversight that Mr. Adams blamed on a “malfunction.”